Tag: Coral Reefs

The Green Buzz: Tuesday, April 9

Written by | April 9th, 2013

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It’s a gorgeous spring day in Washington, DC — which begs the question, how long till the cicadas show up?

  1. Fasten your seat belt, airline travel will get bumpier due to climate change. (Grist)
  2. After a 17-year hiatus, billions of cicadas will soon be invading the East Coast. (Huffington Post Green)
  3. Gulp. Will climate change decimate the wine industry? (Washington Post)
  4. Blink and you might miss it: environmental changes lead to rapid evolution. (Wired)
  5. Air pollution can stunt growth of coral reefs. (RedOrbit)

Cool Green Morning: Friday, January 25

Written by | January 25th, 2013

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Happy Friday! Start your day off right with five interesting green news stories.

  1. How can a dung beetle roll dung at night? Just follow the stars. (Wired)
  2. The Super Bowl will feature Ravens but no chimpanzees. Thank you, CareerBuilder. (Mother Nature Network)
  3. Three weeks after Typhoon Bopha hits the Philippines, coral species are found dead. (Mongabay)
  4. A group of sperm whales adopts an unlikely new friend. (National Geographic)
  5. Guyana pledges to protect it’s national animal, the jaguar. (Guardian)

Expedition to the Spice Islands: Designing a Resilient Network of Marine Protected Areas

Written by | December 5th, 2012

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The Banda Islands are a high priority for marine conservation, and an important area to expand the coverage of marine protected areas (MPAs) in Indonesia.

Cool Green Morning: Monday, December 3

Written by | December 3rd, 2012

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Catch a case of the cool green Mondays:

  1. A “mysterious atmospheric river” doesn’t sound like a good thing, does it? (Scientific American)
  2. The Obama administration might not be ready to tackle climate change, but offshore wind energy is on the table. (CleanTechnica)
  3. NOAA seeks to protect 66 corals under the Endangered Species Act. (DotEarth)
  4. Greenland and Antarctica: “We’re melting!” (Mongabay)
  5. This green First Lady (Bird) will be honored by the US Postal Service on a set of “Forever” stamps. (Treehugger)

Be It Resolved: Giving Thanks to Palau

Written by | November 30th, 2012

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After Palau’s National Congress honored the Conservancy with a resolution of thanks, our Charles Bedford drafted a resolution of his own.

Expedition to the Spice Islands: Challenges and Opportunities for Marine Conservation

Written by | November 20th, 2012

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The Banda Islands have a rich and violent history as the Spice Islands.

Expedition to the Spice Islands: A Refuge for an Endangered Species

Written by | November 20th, 2012

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Napoleon Wrasse are never very abundant, although they do form small aggregations of tens to more than a 100 fish to reproduce. They also change sex from female to male, so most small adults are female and it is mainly the males that exceed 1m in length. Sometimes around spawning time, you can see a harem of Napoleon Wrasse comprising a large male and several smaller females.

Expedition to the Spice Islands: Corals and Volcanoes

Written by | November 20th, 2012

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The coral reefs of the Banda Islands have some of the most spectacular and resilient reefs in the world. One of the reasons for this, is that they are in the heart of the Coral Triangle ⎯ the epicentre of marine diversity.

Expedition to the Spice Islands: A Rapid Marine Assessment

Written by | November 20th, 2012

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Last week (November 7-16th 2012) Conservancy scientist Alison Green traveled to the Banda Islands to help the Coral Triangle Centre conduct a second rapid marine assessment, which focused on collecting the social and ecological information required to design a resilient network of MPAs for the area.

Raja Ampat 2012: Wrapping Up

Written by | November 14th, 2012

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The 2012 Raja Ampat coral reef monitoring trip is coming to a close. Our scientists reflect on an epic trip and what it means for the future of the region.

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