Tag: Borneo

The Green Buzz: Friday, April 12

Written by | April 12th, 2013

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On our radar today: wine, solar flares and cars that run on methane.

  1. The secret is out: unknown population of orangutans found in Borneo (Live Science)
  2. Wine vs. wildlife: climate change may send vineyards into prime wildlife habitat. (National Geographic)
  3. Grab your sunglasses and see video of this morning’s incredible solar flare. (Space)
  4. Remember last year’s huge drought? Scientists confirm it was not due to climate change. (Bloomberg)
  5. Forget hybrids. Russia sees potential in natural gas cars. (NY Times)

The Green Buzz: Friday, March 29

Written by | March 29th, 2013

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Before you start your weekend, here are 5 must-read green news stories.

  1. Africa fairy circles explained… and all circles point towards termites. (NY Times)
  2. Hope comes in the form of a footprint: Sumatran rhino may be alive on Indonesia’s Borneo island. (Washington Post)
  3. A new poll reveals 82% of U.S. adults believe climate change is already occurring. (Nature)
  4. In cool animal news, check out the sticky way a sea hare fools predators. (BBC Nature)
  5. A robot jellyfish could be the future of Navy underwater surveillance. (Wired)

Cool Green Morning: Friday, December 14

Written by | December 14th, 2012

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Brush up on today’s top green news stories (you’ll be the hit of any holiday party this weekend!).

  1. This just in: Amazon trees will likely survive man-made climate change. (RedOrbit)
  2. Do you know where the mercury in your fish comes from? (Grist)
  3. To make a safer bicycle helmet, just look to a woodpecker. (TreeHugger)
  4. New species of slow loris already in jeopardy due to illegal pet trade. Grumble, grumble… (Guardian)
  5. Cook Islands goes for gold and creates world’s largest shark sanctuary. (BBC)

Cool Green Morning: Friday, January 20

Written by | January 20th, 2012

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Don’t worry, particles from the massive solar flare won’t hit our atmosphere till tomorrow.

  1. NASA spacecraft sees massive solar blast, how will effect your weekend? (msnbc)
  2. Roughly 10,000 people have been evacuated as Reno wildfire burns homes. (Huffington Post Green)
  3. A nearly extinct species of monkey has been rediscovered in Borneo. (Wired)
  4. Exxon Mobil will pay Montana $1.6M in penalties over the Yellowstone oil spill. (AP via Washington Post)
  5. The endangered Catalina Island fox has made an astounding comeback. (LA Times)

Cool Green Morning: Friday, July 15

Written by | July 15th, 2011

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It’s animal Friday on Cool Green Morning! We hope you find one of your favorites.

  1. The “rainbow toad,” last seen in 1924, has been rediscovered in Borneo and you have to see the picture. (Guardian)
  2. Watch as a humpback whale puts on a show for the men who saved her. (AP via Huffington Post Green)
  3. Endangered snow leopards are caught on camera in Afghanistan. (Wired)
  4. A walkout has soured the global whaling conference. (Green)
  5. Here’s a serious problem for breeding, male and female giant pandas prefer different habitats. (BBC)

Connecting the Dots on REDD+

Written by | September 24th, 2010

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When it was first introduced in 2005 REDD was a revelation in forest conservation. Five years later a Conservancy scientist looks at a region where its principles are being implemented and measures the impact so far.

Cool Green Morning: Friday, August 13

Written by | August 13th, 2010

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Does Friday the 13th give you the heebie-jeebies? Our round-up of cool green news will cure that:

  1. When it comes to local environmental issues, compromising with industry works. (Green)
  2. Why is Borneo’s orangutan population falling, even in pristine forest areas? (Mongabay)
  3. Tracking turd is a mainstay of wildlife monitoring, but the dung beetle is making scat surveys unreliable in the tropics. (Conservation JournalWatch)
  4. Where does your bottled water come from? Um… most likely the tap. (The Daily Green)
  5. “I do… want to save the forest.” Planting trees is now a law for newlyweds in an Indonesian province. (Huffington Post)

Cool Green Morning: Monday, July 26

Written by | July 26th, 2010

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We’ve got a case of the cool green Mondays:

  1. Check out this fabulous op-ed on the Gulf of Mexico, co-authored by Mike Beck, our very own marine scientist. (New York Times)
  2. The New Republic‘s Bradford Plumer ponders the “what ifs” that could’ve maybe– or maybe not at all– saved climate legislation. (The Vine)
  3. Researchers have rediscovered an endangered otter in Borneo. (Mongabay)
  4. Water shortages threaten development in China. (YaleE360)
  5. Okay, we’re still mourning the Senate bill, but what’s next for climate and energy? (Dot Earth)

Cool Green Morning: Tuesday, June 29

Written by | June 29th, 2010

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In today’s top 5 green news links: the combined efforts of dogs, honey bees and fig trees could save us.

  1. One outcome of the oil spill: the future will be full of Avatar Environmentalists. (Green Biz)
  2. This beats a celebrity sighting at LAX: German airports are using honey bees to monitor air quaility. (The New York Times)
  3. Need proof that canines are a superior species? Researchers have found that dogs are better at finding invasive plants than people. (Conservation Journal Watch)
  4. Plant a fig tree in Borneo and save an endangered species — could it be that easy? (Mongabay)
  5. And… Andy Revkin rounds up more carbon songs. (Dot Earth)

Cool Green Morning: Tuesday, September 8

Written by | September 8th, 2009

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We’re all over the map today — from Bangladesh to London, Borneo to France (and the omnipresent Google), Cool Green Morning covers the globe to bring you the top green links of the day.  What’s a low-carbon zone? And how will such zones help London reduce it’s overall carbon output? Environmental Leader explains the new system, which should help […]

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