Tag: 2030

Cool Green Morning: Thursday, September 27

Written by | September 27th, 2012

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If you’ve ever been hankering to scuba dive a coral reef, now you can. Literally – right now!

  1. Google now offers virtual dives of the world’s coral reefs. (MNN)
  2. 20 governments agree that 100 million people will die by 2030 if the world doesn’t tackle climate change. (Scientific American)
  3. Windows that produce electricity? Laptops whose covers act as chargers? UCLA’s transparent solar film could make it possible. (LA Times)
  4. In New Mexico, we’re burning a forest to save it. (Green)
  5. Now is the moment to get children playing outside again. (Guardian)

Cool Green Morning: Wednesday, September 19

Written by | September 19th, 2012

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This morning we’re got fauna — endangered fauna — on the brain.

  1. Giraffes? Horses? 20 endangered species that will have you saying, “Whaaa…?” (Treehugger)
  2. Not you too, Nemo! (McClatchy)
  3. And this likely won’t help endangered species, let alone nature in general: Urban sprawl expected to triple by 2030. (MNN)
  4. Elephants are being slaughtered in Africa at the highest rates in a decade, and religion is fueling the poaching. (National Geographic)
  5. Some good news: A new monkey has been discovered in Africa. (BBC Nature)

Cool Green Morning: Thursday, October 14

Written by | October 14th, 2010

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So, what are YOUR plans for 2030?

  1. A new report says that we are sucking the life out of the planet so bad that by 2030, we’ll need two. (Mongabay)
  2. Better news for 2030: by then, the United States could be getting 20 percent of its energy from offshore wind. (EcoGeek)
  3. No more phone book litter for the city of Seattle! (Treehugger)
  4. Small businesses really should care about sustainability– and here’s why. (GreenBiz)
  5. Italy’s fighting prostitution by cutting down trees. Um, what? (Guardian.co.uk)
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