Category: Water Conservation

The River Geronimo Knew

Written by | July 7th, 2014

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Not all is doom and gloom on the Arizona-Mexico border where landowners are using an ancient Mexican technique to revive the wetlands of the Rio San Bernardino.

Challenge in Sao Paulo: Overcoming Water Scarcity in South America’s Largest City

Written by | May 22nd, 2014

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The reservoirs that supply water to Sao Paulo are at the lowest capacity ever recorded. As the citizens of South America’s largest city grapple with the crisis, the Conservancy is there — working to help secure water supplies for more than 12 million people.

Overcoming the Water Wars

Written by | April 25th, 2014

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A model for cooperation in the Colorado River Basin has the potential to transform the nature of the water problem in the Western U.S. — while also transforming nature itself.

H2.O: Announcing a New Platform for Water Activists

Written by | March 26th, 2014

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The critical water challenges we face require everyone to be involved. Introducing H2.O, a new digital platform to engage new audiences for the Conservancy’s freshwater work and to create an online community of water activists.

In an Increasingly Unpredictable World, We Must Secure Nature to Secure our Water

Written by | February 21st, 2014

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As a balmy Sochi Olympics wraps up, other parts of the world grapple with droughts and the “polar vortex.” What does this mean for our water supplies? In this reality, writes Dr. Giulio Boccaletti, the role of nature in securing a sustainable water future becomes critically important.

The Green Buzz: Tuesday, January 14

Written by | January 14th, 2014

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Emperor penguins are climbing cliffs to avoid climate change and forest elephants are making it rain in today’s #greennews.

  1. Four colonies of iconic emperor penguins were spotted climbing cliffs to avoid increasingly rampant ice melt. (Mother Nature Network
  2. Tropical forests play a large role in precipitation around the world and in Congo, they’re bolstered by the eating & excreting of the forest elephant. (BBC)
  3. A recent MIT study projects that 52% of the world’s population in 2050 will live in water-stressed areas. (Treehugger)

The Green Buzz: Monday, January 13

Written by | January 13th, 2014

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Saving the radioactive cows, West Virginians soon to have clean water restored, and an attitude adjustment re: urban biodiversity in today’s green news.

  1. “Let the Cows of Hope Live!” is the call of a rancher seeking to save cows turned radioactive after the Fukushima power plant disaster.  (NY Times)
  2. A West Virginia chemical spill, which left many residents without access to clean running water for five days, is thankfully nearing its end.  (Huffington Post)
  3. Have US cities woken up to the value of urban wildlife?  Some say the changes taking place look like the start of an urban biodiversity movement.  (Yale Environment 360)

The Green Buzz: Tuesday, January 7

Written by | January 7th, 2014

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Science gets to the bottom of mysteries like widely reported “earthquake lights” and the true age of the cockroach in today’s green news.

1. While people for millenia have reported seeing mysterious lights immediately before earthquakes, scientists think they’ve found the answer in a unique reaction by stressed rocks. (National Geographic)

2. Researchers in northwest Colorado recently discovered 49-million-year-old fossilized cockroaches, pushing back the bug’s known Earth record by a full 5 million years. (Live Science)

3. California’s lack of snowfall this winter hurts more than avid skiers; it means people and nature in the state will have a lot less freshwater at their disposal. (Grist)

4. Windpower in the UK generated a record 10% of the country’s electricity in December, enough for 5.7 million homes during one of the most energy-intensive times of the year. (TreeHugger)

The World’s New Megacities Must Be the Drivers of the ‘Smart’ Water Revolution

Written by | November 13th, 2013

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As cities grow to tens of millions strong, accelerated urbanization coupled with concerns for water security is energizing the “smart” water tech market.

The Natural Choice for Our Water Resources

Written by | September 19th, 2013

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We should be considering natural infrastructure along with man-made structures like dams to help us manage our water resources.

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