Category: Uncategorized

Ghost Fleet of Mallows Bay

Written by | July 1st, 2014

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A visit to Mallows Bay reveals history, mystery and the living ghosts at the site of a proposed national marine sanctuary in the Potomac River.

We Don’t See Borders — We Just See Blue

Written by | June 18th, 2014

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Heads of state, finance and environmental ministers, philanthropists, scientists and at least one movie star… make over $1.8 billion in total commitments at Our Ocean conference. A meaningful down payment for the health of our ocean.

New Chief Operating Officer Lois Quam Chats with Mark Tercek

Written by | June 10th, 2014

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The Nature Conservancy’s new Chief Operating Officer, Lois Quam, chats with CEO Mark Tercek about “making the impossible possible in conservation.” Read more as Lois discusses innovation, global health, leadership, and growing up on the Great Plains.

Building a Broader Conservation Movement

Written by | February 28th, 2014

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As Black History Month draws to a close, Mark Tercek and Hazel Wong reflect on how to build a broader and more diverse conservation movement.

Scaling Up Water Sustainability

Written by | February 3rd, 2014

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As countries around the globe look to scale up water sustainability, Dr. Giulio Boccaletti argues that protecting natural infrastructure — lakes, aquifers and wetlands — is in many cases the most cost-effective option to provide clean water.

The Green Buzz: Monday, January 27

Written by | January 27th, 2014

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States as trustees of the atmosphere, an exploding cow sitcom, and climate change heats up at Davos in today’s green news.

  1. First case of its kind: Courts will determine whether or not, by repealing greenhouse gas regulations, the state of New Mexico has violated its public trust duty to protect the state’s atmosphere.  (Los Angeles Times)
  2. A new four-episode Hulu sitcom produced by Chipotle, “Farmed and Dangerous,” will seek to educate consumers about factory farming using satire.  The series will premier February 17th.  (Mother Nature Network)
  3. Leaders in Davos last week stressed the need for a global re-commitment to curbing climate change, focusing on the economic and humanitarian risks of inaction.  (The Globe and Mail)

The Green Buzz: Wednesday, January 15

Written by | January 15th, 2014

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Climate change illustrated haiku, exponential tree growth, and disappearing sea cows–all in today’s green news.

  1. A scientist uses very creative means to communicate the main points of the latest Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change report.  (Sightline Daily)
  2. A study in California finds that trees’ growth rates actually increase over their lifetime.  What are the implications in terms of the techniques we use to capture carbon using forests?  (The Guardian)
  3. The manatee–an animal with no natural predators–has virtually disappeared from Florida coasts.  Scientists seek to solve this mystery.  (Earth Island Journal)

The Green Buzz: Tuesday, January 14

Written by | January 14th, 2014

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Emperor penguins are climbing cliffs to avoid climate change and forest elephants are making it rain in today’s #greennews.

  1. Four colonies of iconic emperor penguins were spotted climbing cliffs to avoid increasingly rampant ice melt. (Mother Nature Network
  2. Tropical forests play a large role in precipitation around the world and in Congo, they’re bolstered by the eating & excreting of the forest elephant. (BBC)
  3. A recent MIT study projects that 52% of the world’s population in 2050 will live in water-stressed areas. (Treehugger)

The Green Buzz: January 8, 2014

Written by | January 9th, 2014

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A lake dries up overnight, British factory workers might start to work the night shift, and environmental standards are catching on in Asia in today’s green news.

  1. Patagonian glaciers are losing mass faster and for longer periods than glaciers in any other part of the world.  So much so that Lake Cachet II literally dried up over night.  (Huffington Post)
  2. The wind blows all night, so British factory workers will work all night.  Want to understand that logic?  (The Telegraph)
  3. Factories in Asia are starting to see the sense and savings in environmental standards.  (The New York Times)

The Green Buzz: Tuesday, January 7

Written by | January 7th, 2014

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Science gets to the bottom of mysteries like widely reported “earthquake lights” and the true age of the cockroach in today’s green news.

1. While people for millenia have reported seeing mysterious lights immediately before earthquakes, scientists think they’ve found the answer in a unique reaction by stressed rocks. (National Geographic)

2. Researchers in northwest Colorado recently discovered 49-million-year-old fossilized cockroaches, pushing back the bug’s known Earth record by a full 5 million years. (Live Science)

3. California’s lack of snowfall this winter hurts more than avid skiers; it means people and nature in the state will have a lot less freshwater at their disposal. (Grist)

4. Windpower in the UK generated a record 10% of the country’s electricity in December, enough for 5.7 million homes during one of the most energy-intensive times of the year. (TreeHugger)

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