Category: The Green Buzz

The Green Buzz: Wednesday, January 15

Written by | January 15th, 2014

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Climate change illustrated haiku, exponential tree growth, and disappearing sea cows–all in today’s green news.

  1. A scientist uses very creative means to communicate the main points of the latest Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change report.  (Sightline Daily)
  2. A study in California finds that trees’ growth rates actually increase over their lifetime.  What are the implications in terms of the techniques we use to capture carbon using forests?  (The Guardian)
  3. The manatee–an animal with no natural predators–has virtually disappeared from Florida coasts.  Scientists seek to solve this mystery.  (Earth Island Journal)

The Green Buzz: Tuesday, January 14

Written by | January 14th, 2014

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Emperor penguins are climbing cliffs to avoid climate change and forest elephants are making it rain in today’s #greennews.

  1. Four colonies of iconic emperor penguins were spotted climbing cliffs to avoid increasingly rampant ice melt. (Mother Nature Network
  2. Tropical forests play a large role in precipitation around the world and in Congo, they’re bolstered by the eating & excreting of the forest elephant. (BBC)
  3. A recent MIT study projects that 52% of the world’s population in 2050 will live in water-stressed areas. (Treehugger)

The Green Buzz: Monday, January 13

Written by | January 13th, 2014

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Saving the radioactive cows, West Virginians soon to have clean water restored, and an attitude adjustment re: urban biodiversity in today’s green news.

  1. “Let the Cows of Hope Live!” is the call of a rancher seeking to save cows turned radioactive after the Fukushima power plant disaster.  (NY Times)
  2. A West Virginia chemical spill, which left many residents without access to clean running water for five days, is thankfully nearing its end.  (Huffington Post)
  3. Have US cities woken up to the value of urban wildlife?  Some say the changes taking place look like the start of an urban biodiversity movement.  (Yale Environment 360)

The Green Buzz: Friday, January 10

Written by | January 10th, 2014

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Asian companies slowly going green, plus a new national park hits a snag in Maine in today’s #Greennews.

  1. America’s best idea, national parks, isn’t such a great idea in Maine or some may think so (NYTimes)
  2. Tiny bits of plastic collecting in the Great Lakes pose an environmental threat (NYTimes)
  3. The White House tackles the #polarvortex in Google+ Hangout (Guardian).

The Green Buzz: January 9, 2014

Written by | January 9th, 2014

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Dolphins getting high? Plus, fish light up the night and the upside to the #polarvortex all in today’s #Greennews

  1. Scientists have observed dolphins using puffer fish, who possess an extremely lethal toxin to humans, as a chew toy leading scientists to believe that there may be some recreational use being derived for dolphins (NBC)
  2. These fish are fancy (NatGeo)
  3. Scientists are heralding the polar vortex’s impact on invasive species in affected areas. (NYTimes)

The Green Buzz: January 8, 2014

Written by | January 9th, 2014

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A lake dries up overnight, British factory workers might start to work the night shift, and environmental standards are catching on in Asia in today’s green news.

  1. Patagonian glaciers are losing mass faster and for longer periods than glaciers in any other part of the world.  So much so that Lake Cachet II literally dried up over night.  (Huffington Post)
  2. The wind blows all night, so British factory workers will work all night.  Want to understand that logic?  (The Telegraph)
  3. Factories in Asia are starting to see the sense and savings in environmental standards.  (The New York Times)

The Green Buzz: Tuesday, January 7

Written by | January 7th, 2014

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Science gets to the bottom of mysteries like widely reported “earthquake lights” and the true age of the cockroach in today’s green news.

1. While people for millenia have reported seeing mysterious lights immediately before earthquakes, scientists think they’ve found the answer in a unique reaction by stressed rocks. (National Geographic)

2. Researchers in northwest Colorado recently discovered 49-million-year-old fossilized cockroaches, pushing back the bug’s known Earth record by a full 5 million years. (Live Science)

3. California’s lack of snowfall this winter hurts more than avid skiers; it means people and nature in the state will have a lot less freshwater at their disposal. (Grist)

4. Windpower in the UK generated a record 10% of the country’s electricity in December, enough for 5.7 million homes during one of the most energy-intensive times of the year. (TreeHugger)

The Green Buzz: January 6, 2014

Written by | January 6th, 2014

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Supervolcanos could explode without warning, a giant panda will debut, and changes in NYC streets captured on film in today’s green news.

  1. “Sleeping giant” supervolcanos, like the one in Yellowstone National Park, may not be as heavy of sleepers as we once thought.  (BBC)
  2. If you plan to be in the Washington, DC are on January 18th, be sure to stop by The Smithsonian’s National Zoo; their new giant panda cub, Bao Bao, will make her public debut that day.  (Huffington Post)
  3. See how New York City has worked to improve the walk- and bike-ability of its streets over the last decade.  (Grist)

The Green Buzz: January 3, 2014

Written by | January 3rd, 2014

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Where do all those Christmas trees go after the holidays? Plus, US Secretary of State, John Kerry, talks about climate change in the Mekong Delta.

  1. Where do all those Christmas Trees go after the holidays (Guardian)?
  2. US Secretary of State, John Kerry, touches on the future of the Mekong Delta (NYTimes).
  3. Forest found by using Google Earth declared protected because of the abundance of unique species (Guardian).

 

The Green Buzz: January 2, 2014

Written by | January 2nd, 2014

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Happy New Year! 2014 is sure to be a memorable one for environmental news. Let’s check out some of the latest stories…

  1. Under the sea even creatures in the deepest oceans will not escape climate change (Guardian).
  2. What does “Waldeinsamkeit” mean? Turns out it’s German for “the feeling of being alone in the woods” (BN).
  3. Two test events were cancelled last year in Sochi ahead of the 2014 Winter Olympic games, will there be enough snow (SI)?

 

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