Category: Science

The Green Buzz: Thursday, January 30

Written by | January 30th, 2014

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Goodbye for now Green Buzz!

We’re moving the daily #greennews to our social channels for the time being. You can stay up to date on all of today’s green news by following our hashtag #greennews on Twitter.

Building From a Merger That Didn’t Happen

Written by | January 24th, 2014

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Mark Tercek, CEO of The Nature Conservancy, and Brett Jenks, CEO of Rare, discuss why the two organizations have decided not to merge. Together, we can achieve better results for conservation as highly aligned, but independent, organizations.

Polar Vortex ≠ Climate Change

Written by | January 9th, 2014

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Did you experience the “polar vortex”? It’s generated a lot of questions about climate change, and CEO Mark Tercek has got some answers.

The Green Buzz: Tuesday, January 7

Written by | January 7th, 2014

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Science gets to the bottom of mysteries like widely reported “earthquake lights” and the true age of the cockroach in today’s green news.

1. While people for millenia have reported seeing mysterious lights immediately before earthquakes, scientists think they’ve found the answer in a unique reaction by stressed rocks. (National Geographic)

2. Researchers in northwest Colorado recently discovered 49-million-year-old fossilized cockroaches, pushing back the bug’s known Earth record by a full 5 million years. (Live Science)

3. California’s lack of snowfall this winter hurts more than avid skiers; it means people and nature in the state will have a lot less freshwater at their disposal. (Grist)

4. Windpower in the UK generated a record 10% of the country’s electricity in December, enough for 5.7 million homes during one of the most energy-intensive times of the year. (TreeHugger)

The Green Buzz: Thursday, December 26

Written by | December 26th, 2013

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Science communicated through stunning photography in today’s green news.

  1. A digital photographer captures entire sunsets in single images — Claude Monet would have approved.  (Huffington Post)
  2. A 1 billion pixel digital camera will be sent into space on the next Gaia telescope.  Scientists hope to capture the best photos of the galaxy yet, and Virgin Galactic hopes to begin to map some of its future tours.  (CNN)
  3. Check out the most awesome science photos of the year.  (Buzzfeed)

The Green Buzz: Monday, December 23

Written by | December 23rd, 2013

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Today’s green news comes straight from the Arctic:

  1. Scientists discovered an extensive aquifer that sits below the Greenland ice sheet all year round.  Whether this water will find its way to the ocean must be determined in order to make accurate sea level rise predictions.  (Mother Nature Network)
  2. Due to Russia’s post-Soviet economic downturn, Arctic fish in the region are much healthier than those off of North America and Europe, with far less mercury detected in their systems.  (Nature World News)
  3. Message in an Arctic bottle!  Note found from scientists left in 1959, who predicted glacial melt long before this phenomenon was believed to be happening.  (International Business Times)

The Green Buzz: Tuesday, December 17

Written by | December 17th, 2013

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The mystery of zebra stripes is explained, plus a threat to bananas in today’s green news.

  1. Perhaps it’s time to put out a salt lick for these ibexes in Italy… (NPR)
  2. It appears as though black and white zebra stripes create an optical illusion and confuse predators. (BBC Nature)
  3. How do we decide which species to save? When 20,000 animals are on the brink, is it time to rethink our methods? (National Geographic)
  4. A banana fungus is threatening the world’s supply of the fruit; it may be time to satiate your appetite now. (Huffington Post)
  5. Whoa. The supervolcano below Yellowstone is 2.5 times bigger than previously thought. (The Independent)

The Green Buzz: Thursday, December 12

Written by | December 12th, 2013

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The centuries old debate, “nature vs. nuture” finally has a winner…when it comes to fruit flies. Plus, aliens invade New York City!!

  1. Researchers with the Virginia Bioinformatics Institute at Virginia Tech studying fruit flies that live on opposite slopes of a unique natural environment known as “Evolution Canyon” show that even with migration, cross-breeding, and sometimes the obliteration of the populations, the driving force in the gene pool is largely the environment. (PHYS.org)
  2. Just like Men In Black, A newly seen species of cockroach invades New York City, Periplaneta japonica. (National Geographic)
  3. Did you know that chameleons change colors to communicate? (LabEquipment)

The Green Buzz: Tuesday, December 10

Written by | December 10th, 2013

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Cockroaches and takeout containers together again in today’s green news.

  1. Snowy owls (Hedwig!) were shot at JFK’s airport to protect planes from engine failure. (MNN)
  2. There’s a new Asian cockroach in town, and researchers say it loves the cold. Eww. (Live Science)
  3. Can used takeout containers be recycled? That’s the question at the heart of a proposal to ban them in NYC. (New York Times)
  4. Are you in Florida? Help scientists find the missing pilot whales. (CNN)
  5. Local cities to Washington: If you’re not going to take lead on climate change, move out of the way. (Huffington Post)

The Green Buzz: Monday, December 9

Written by | December 9th, 2013

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Less green news makes us dull, that’s what happened recently at the New York Times.

  1. Shocking decline of countryside bird in the UK. (Guardian)
  2. Save the whales! Right now!! More whales die in the Florida Everglades & scientists don’t know why? (Guardian)
  3. Real vs fake Christmas trees? Which is better for the environment? (Wunderground)
  4. Wind energy advocates discuss why wind energy works. (Guardian)
  5. Post Hurricane Sandy, some New Jersey residents want a “greener” post Sandy recovery plan. (NJ.com)
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