Category: Protected Areas

The Green Buzz: Thursday, August 1

Written by | August 1st, 2013

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It’s a new day and a new month, so let’s start it off right with some green news.

  1. Want to get closer to nature? Try following a toddler, for whom “…the dried worm as tragic as a starving polar bear; the walnut shell as mysterious as the queen conch.” (Grist)
  2. Iraq has declared its first national park in the southern marshlands that many call the cradle of civilization. (National Geographic)
  3. Amazon Prime sure is convenient… but is it eco-friendly? (MNN)
  4. The Apollo Lunar Landing Legacy Act has many asking if it’s really time for space environmentalism. (Wired)
  5. The Caribbean has lost 80 percent — that’s right, 80 — of its coral reef cover in recent years. (The Guardian)

The Green Buzz: Monday, July 22

Written by | July 22nd, 2013

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Let’s launch into Monday’s green news.

  1. Video: The giant corpse flower has bloomed at the U.S. Botanical Garden. (Science World Report)
  2. A clingy sea turtle that didn’t seem to want to be released has found a new home. (CNN)
  3. Watch how it’s done: a video on the removal of an Oregon dam. (MNN)
  4. June 2013 broke global heat records; 5th hottest month on record. (Christian Science Monitor)
  5. Bombs dropped on the Great Barrier Reef are insult to an already injured reef. (National Geographic)

The Green Buzz: Thursday, July 11

Written by | July 11th, 2013

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From ugly animals to a national park on the moon, we’ve got your green news!

  1. Lorax wanted. Because Amazon deforestation has dramatically increased in countries outside of Brazil. (Mongabay)
  2. Pictures: Newly formed Ugly Animal Protection Society says these guys need saving, too. (Discovery News)
  3. Do we have to save one species over another to protect America’s wilderness? (NPR)
  4. Far out: U.S. lawmakers propose a national lunar park to protect artifacts left on the moon by NASA astronauts. (MNN)
  5. China and the U.S. have agreed to work together to capture carbon dioxide spewing from their respective power plants. (Bloomberg)

The Green Buzz: Monday, July 8

Written by | July 8th, 2013

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We’ve got some “shocking” green news for you this Monday morning.

  1. A static charge — derived from insects’ flapping wings — helps spider webs catch prey. (Discovery News)
  2. Why were 50,000 bumblebees found dead in a parking lot? (TreeHugger)
  3. Agriculture runoff + water quality scientists = a possible answer as to what agricultural pollution is doing to our freshwater sources. (NPR)
  4. PETA the target of protests for euthanizing animals at its shelter in Virginia. (New York Times)
  5. Still need summer vacation plans? The 12 must-see views at U.S. National Parks should help. (MNN)

A Thirst For Growth: Fueling China’s Urban Expansion

Written by | July 3rd, 2013

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As China grows to an urban population of 900 million people, the most critical thing it will have to get right is protecting its water supply, says the director of our Securing Water Program.

For America’s Birthday, Take Your Party to a Park

Written by | July 3rd, 2013

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This Independence Day, our guest blogger reflects on how fortunate we are that so much of America has been preserved for our enjoyment and enlightenment.

The Green Buzz: Thursday, June 13

Written by | June 13th, 2013

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Today’s green news is filled with tidbits on big cats, disease outbreaks and new discoveries.

  1. Domesticated dogs + Sumatran tigers = a new threat to these endangered cats. (National Geographic)
  2. Say it ain’t so: “Coffee rust” threatening good coffee by attacking Arabica coffee plants. (Wired)
  3. The days of cheap food are over, thanks to climate change. (Grist)
  4. We know they’re fast, but it’s something else that makes cheetahs the successful hunters they are. (NPR)
  5. It seems as though we are still learning new things about this thick forest everyday: 15 new bird species discovered in the Amazon! (Mongabay)

The Green Buzz: Wednesday, June 12

Written by | June 12th, 2013

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There’s happy news for chimps in today’s green news.

  1. Lab testing on chimps may be ending in the U.S. (Treehugger)
  2. Bloomberg unveiled a massive plan to protect the Big Apple from future effects of climate change. (Huffington Post)
  3. But we’re sure it would help to have the world get on track with its climate goals. Here’s how one study says it can. (Grist)
  4. Those bird apps that mimic birdsong? They’re harming birds. (BBC News)
  5. Proposed housing development + existing (and massive) bat cave = major debate. (NPR)

The Green Buzz: Monday, June 10

Written by | June 10th, 2013

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Hidden wildfires, ocean trash, and wolves are just some of the green news tidbits we’ve found for you this morning.

  1. The USFWS announced that wolves are losing their federal protection in almost all of the lower 48 states. (LA Times)
  2. This bums us out: Most of the trash that litters the ocean floor is recyclable. (MNN)
  3. For victims of Hurricane Sandy, the worst is not over. (Huffington Post)
  4. Clearly the problem of climate change and emissions has not been solved. (Washington Post)
  5. Think deforestation is the Amazon’s biggest problem? Think again. (It’s hidden fires.) (NASA)

The Green Buzz: Monday, May 20

Written by | May 20th, 2013

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As the weather warms up, so too does the green news on climate change…

  1. If we carry on as usual, climate change will bring water shortages in major U.S. cities. (Bloomberg)
  2. By the 2020s, NYC could see heat-wave deaths rise by 20 percent (thanks again to climate change). (The Guardian)
  3. You know it’s bad when people wish for fire ants instead of the newly invasive ‘crazy ants.’ (MNN)
  4. What the frack do we know? Turns out, not a lot. (Grist)
  5. Landmark ruling in Indonesia gives millions of hectares of forests to Indigenous people. (Mongabay)
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