Category: Insects

The Green Buzz: Wednesday, June 19

Written by | June 19th, 2013

 (0)

We’ve all heard that bees are in decline, but this morning’s green news puts that in visual perspective.

  1. View pics: This is your grocery store without bees. (PR Newswire
  2. This new app will help you find the cleanest, safest beach. (MNN)
  3. Man feeds bear some bbq, bear attacks man, man charged. (Christian Science Monitor)
  4. The U.S. is considering exporting more oil for the first time since the 1970s. (Bloomberg)
  5. There are now more fish being farmed than there are cows. (New Scientist)

The Green Buzz: Thursday, May 30

Written by | May 30th, 2013

 (0)

In today’s green news, we meet a swashbuckling new species.

  1. New pirate ant — eyepatch included! — discovered in the Philippines. (National Geographic)
  2. Kenya cracks down on poachers: increases fines by 2,500%. (Mongabay)
  3. Can you name the first bird ever discovered? This Jurassic fossil may help. (Nature)
  4. Make quick like a fox. Conservation efforts save dwarf foxes from extinction in record time. (TreeHugger)
  5. Google Street View takes you to the Galapagos Islands from the comfort of your desk chair. (Guardian)

The Green Buzz: Tuesday, May 28

Written by | May 28th, 2013

 (0)

On today’s to-do list: read a green news story, wait for the cicadas, repeat.

  1. Saving wild species: a herculean effort or more harm than good? (Mother Nature Network)
  2. For the cicada obsessed, tune into The Cicada Cam! (The Science Channel)
  3. Beautifying ugly freeway underpasses, one recycled bike chandelier at a time. (TreeHugger)
  4. The loss of biodiversity is happening faster and everywhere, even among farm animals. (RedOrbit)
  5. Once frozen in time, moss from the “Little Ice Age” is growing again. (BBC)

The Green Buzz: Tuesday, May 14

Written by | May 14th, 2013

 (0)

Sharing today’s top green news headlines… with a side of bugs!

  1. How can you fight this summer’s wildfires without firefighters? (Washington Post)
  2. The eagle death toll at wind farms shows renewable energy comes with consequences. (AP)
  3. Half of common plants and a third of animals could lose habitat. We’ll let you guess the cause… (BBC Nature)
  4. How would you spend $50 million for the planet? (Grist)
  5. Let them eat bugs! Fighting world hunger with… insects. (Telegraph)

The Green Buzz: Thursday, May 9

Written by | May 9th, 2013

 (0)

Moths that drive cars? Frankenfish? Goats at airports? It’s news of the weird this morning!

  1. Chicago’s O’Hare has new landscaping employees: goats. (MNN)
  2. IUCN has released a list of the world’s most endangered ecosystems. (Huffington Post)
  3. Frankenfish or scientific marvel? Giant GM salmon await approval in the US. (Mongabay)
  4. Finally, some not-so-terrible climate change news. (Grist)
  5. University of Tokyo posted a video of moths driving cars. Really. (NPR)

The Green Buzz: Tuesday, April 30

Written by | April 30th, 2013

 (0)

Never thought I’d say this, but today’s green news has me marveling at cicadas.

  1. NYC’s urban jungle and the real jungle aren’t so different when it comes to evolution. (TreeHugger)
  2. Yes, they’re annoying, but learning how a cicada keeps its wings clean is pretty rad. (Science World)
  3. This just in: plants could offset 1% of global warming worldwide. (Daily Mail)
  4. When words aren’t an option, fish use sign language to communicate. (National Geographic)
  5. Save the bees, ban pesticides, says the EU. (BBC Nature)

The Green Buzz: Tuesday, April 9

Written by | April 9th, 2013

 (0)

It’s a gorgeous spring day in Washington, DC — which begs the question, how long till the cicadas show up?

  1. Fasten your seat belt, airline travel will get bumpier due to climate change. (Grist)
  2. After a 17-year hiatus, billions of cicadas will soon be invading the East Coast. (Huffington Post Green)
  3. Gulp. Will climate change decimate the wine industry? (Washington Post)
  4. Blink and you might miss it: environmental changes lead to rapid evolution. (Wired)
  5. Air pollution can stunt growth of coral reefs. (RedOrbit)

The Green Buzz: Friday, April 5

Written by | April 5th, 2013

 (0)

Sorry to kick your weekend off on a terrifying note, but…

  1. No need to panic: scientists have discovered a new species of tarantula, and it’s only about the size OF YOUR FACE. (Huffington Post Green)
  2. Greener neighborhoods=less violent crime. (Mongabay)
  3. No need to panic, part II: Tax Day is coming! Find out how saving energy can save you $$. (Christian Science Monitor)
  4. That terrible American drought? Yeah, still happening. (Grist)
  5. Spending time outside doesn’t always come naturally to everyone. (Care2)

The Green Buzz: Thursday, April 4

Written by | April 4th, 2013

 (0)

What is Cicadapocalypse? What do pigs and donuts have in common? We’ve got these answers and more in today’s Green Buzz.

  1. Cicadapocalypse is coming — are you prepared? (MNN)
  2. Greensburg, Kansas, was blown off the map by a tornado in 2007, but now it’s back and greener than ever. (Grist)
  3. Commons pesticides are affecting the ability of bees to learn and remember. (BBC Nature)
  4. Tim Horton’s says “bye bye” to pig gestation crates by 2022. (Huffington Post)
  5. Our oil pipeline structure is aging (no surprise there) and the Arkansas oil spill proves it. (NPR)

The Green Buzz: Monday, April 1

Written by | April 1st, 2013

 (0)

Today’s green news round-up is no joke.

  1. Concern grows for the future of the monarch butterfly. (YaleE360)
  2. Want to get healthier? Ride your bike to work. It’s science. (Grist)
  3. This writer says hemp can solve a whole lot of our green dilemmas. (Mongabay)
  4. Why is Antarctica getting icier? Climate change. (Not a paradox.) (Christian Science Monitor)
  5. Climate crusader Bill McKibben has some thoughts on how businesses can help combat global warming. (GreenBiz)
Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...



About Conservancy Talk

We're green. We're nature-lovers. We are Conservancy Talk. Hear Nature Conservancy staff and invited experts share their voices on today’s conservation issues — in our uniquely rigorous, science-based way. Learn more