Category: Fresh Water

Colorado River: Hope for the Hopeless?

Written by | March 27th, 2014

 (4)

When Taylor Hawes first became director of the Conservancy’s Colorado River Program, people told her she was crazy. But is the Colorado River really a lost cause? As water flows today, Hawes sees hope for the hopeless.

The Green Buzz: Tuesday, January 14

Written by | January 14th, 2014

 (0)

Emperor penguins are climbing cliffs to avoid climate change and forest elephants are making it rain in today’s #greennews.

  1. Four colonies of iconic emperor penguins were spotted climbing cliffs to avoid increasingly rampant ice melt. (Mother Nature Network
  2. Tropical forests play a large role in precipitation around the world and in Congo, they’re bolstered by the eating & excreting of the forest elephant. (BBC)
  3. A recent MIT study projects that 52% of the world’s population in 2050 will live in water-stressed areas. (Treehugger)

The Green Buzz: Tuesday, January 7

Written by | January 7th, 2014

 (1)

Science gets to the bottom of mysteries like widely reported “earthquake lights” and the true age of the cockroach in today’s green news.

1. While people for millenia have reported seeing mysterious lights immediately before earthquakes, scientists think they’ve found the answer in a unique reaction by stressed rocks. (National Geographic)

2. Researchers in northwest Colorado recently discovered 49-million-year-old fossilized cockroaches, pushing back the bug’s known Earth record by a full 5 million years. (Live Science)

3. California’s lack of snowfall this winter hurts more than avid skiers; it means people and nature in the state will have a lot less freshwater at their disposal. (Grist)

4. Windpower in the UK generated a record 10% of the country’s electricity in December, enough for 5.7 million homes during one of the most energy-intensive times of the year. (TreeHugger)

No Dream Too Big for China’s Mother River

Written by | December 3rd, 2013

 (0)

With colossal dams interrupting the Yangtze River, it’s easy to say the river is gone. But large rivers are more resilient than that and what we do now will be invaluable for the many rivers around the world facing their own uncertain futures.

The Green Buzz: Monday, November 25

Written by | November 25th, 2013

 (0)

Tyrannosaurus Rex’s worst nightmare is in today’s green news.

  1. T-Rex was relegated to the shadows when this newly-discovered giant came thudding by. (Salt Lake Tribune)
  2. A U.S. power company has pled guilty to the wind farm-related deaths of golden eagles in Wyoming. (Christian Science Monitor)
  3. Sharks rejoice! Indonesia’s national airline has banned the transport of fins from their flights. (Mongabay)
  4. The U.S. is losing coastal wetlands at a rate of seven football fields per hour. (NPR)
  5. How to feed a growing number of mouths? Here are six sustainable ways to feed 11 billion people. (MNN)

The Natural Choice for Our Water Resources

Written by | September 19th, 2013

 (0)

We should be considering natural infrastructure along with man-made structures like dams to help us manage our water resources.

New Water Fund in Mexico for People and Nature

Written by | September 18th, 2013

 (2)

The launch of the Monterrey Metropolitan Water Fund in Mexico is a great example of a triple win — a project that protects nature, meets people’s needs, and provides good returns on investment for businesses and governments.

Celebrating 5 Years in Mongolia

Written by | September 16th, 2013

 (0)

Charles Bedford has been going to Mongolia for many years and we recently caught up with him after his most recent visit to attend the Mongolia Green Development Conference in UlaanBaatar, a conference held to mark the 5th anniversary of the Conservancy’s Mongolia program.

The Right Stuff for U.S. Water Resources

Written by | September 16th, 2013

 (0)

George C. Grugett helped bring forth the “room for our rivers” approach to managing our water resources — and it’s one that should be used more often.

It’s a Mistake for NGOs Not to Engage with Hydropower Companies

Written by | August 20th, 2013

 (4)

Hydropower may be controversial, but NGOs must engage with the hydropower community to ensure the impact is positive, says our managing director of global freshwater.

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...



About Conservancy Talk

We're green. We're nature-lovers. We are Conservancy Talk. Hear Nature Conservancy staff and invited experts share their voices on today’s conservation issues — in our uniquely rigorous, science-based way. Learn more

Latest Tweets from @nature_org