Category: Green Living

The Green Buzz: Monday, October 21

Written by | October 21st, 2013

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Another mysterious fish washes ashore in today’s green news.

  1. How many tree species do you think reside in the Amazon? A new report estimates just how diverse the rainforest is. (Pentagon Post)
  2. Another rare oarfish has washed ashore in California, and scientists are stumped as to why. (Reuters)
  3. This report has us wondering what our oceans are going to look like by 2100. (Environment News Service)
  4. The end of an oil era is 2070, says a major oil company. (MNN)
  5. Giant Asian tiger shrimp — we’re talking the length of a forearm — have invaded U.S. waters. (TreeHugger)

The Green Buzz: Thursday, October 17

Written by | October 17th, 2013

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Welp, the shutdown is over. Any lasting effects in the science world? We’re here to report.

  1. The world’s largest fast food enterprise is taking a green step forward in the world of trash. (Environment News Service)
  2. The damaging effects to science because of the government shutdown will continue to last. (Scientific American)
  3. And the damage to our national parks? The shutdown cost many of them hundreds of thousands — even millions — of dollars. (Huffington Post)
  4. The home to nearly a quarter of endangered mountain gorillas seems like a great place to drill for oil, right? Right? (MNN)
  5. Kenya is attempting a new, tech-savvy way to stop rhino poaching. (Times Live)

Winter Biking Tips: What You Need to Know

Written by | October 15th, 2013

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The days are getting shorter, the temperatures are dropping and that can only mean one thing: more people getting off their bikes and into their cars. Here are 5 tips to keep you biking and warm, all winter-long.

The Green Buzz: Thursday, October 10

Written by | October 10th, 2013

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There are lots of climate change updates in today’s green news.

  1. Humans are living longer these days, and guess what that means for endangered species? (UC Davis)
  2. Nearly one year after Hurricane Sandy hit, New Jersey residents want their politicians to do something about climate change. (Bloomberg)
  3. Love fish for dinner? Here are some things you should know about your restaurant/grocery store choices. (NPR)
  4. Unprecedented changes in climate are coming very soon for the tropics, and for Washington, D.C. by 2047. (Washington Post)
  5. A legally binding treaty to help curb worldwide mercury pollution is being signed. (BBC News)

The Green Buzz: Monday, October 7

Written by | October 7th, 2013

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Another compelling reason for why not to cut down the world’s rain forests is in today’s green news.

  1. An expedition to some of the planet’s most remote and unexplored rain forests has found 60 new species! (National Geographic)
  2. Stink bugs are coming, but workers who count this invasive insect are furloughed. (Consumer Reports)
  3. When the ocean is a desert, this creature helps coral reefs thrive. (BBC News)
  4. These 14 inventions were inspired by the greatest and most successful “machine” in the universe: Nature. (Bloomberg)
  5. Let’s meet the man who made sea-level rise disappear in North Carolina. (MNN)

The Green Buzz: Tuesday, September 24

Written by | September 24th, 2013

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We’ve got some stinky green news this morning for ya. Hold your nose and read on!

  1. Do you smell that? 5 animals with impressively stinky defenses. (Nat Geo)
  2. Why CrossFit may be the greenest gym option out there. (TreeHugger)
  3. Brace yourself: thunder, hail and tornadoes may be on the way. (Grist)
  4. Age ain’t nothing but a number… but the moon is 100 million years younger than thought! (Space)
  5. Reducing greenhouse gas emissions could prevent up to 3 million premature deaths a year. (LiveScience)

The Green Buzz: Thursday, September 19

Written by | September 19th, 2013

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Are you ready for some football in this morning’s green news?

  1. Can we get an “O-H!” That’s right, you may not love their football, but the Buckeyes are calling a new play, and it’s decidedly green. (Washington Post)
  2. Those towering, somewhat fantastical baobab trees? They’re another casualty of climate change. (Scientific American)
  3. It doesn’t make headlines like elephants or rhinos do, but the pangolin is being poached to death. (Environment 360)
  4. The creation of a science laureate seemed like a good idea, you know, to help encourage future scientists. Until it was derailed by politics… (NPR)
  5. Russian Coast Guard fired on a Greenpeace ship and arrested four; the activists were trying to draw attention to Arctic drilling. (Environmental News Service)

The Green Buzz: Monday, September 16

Written by | September 16th, 2013

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The Nature Conservancy offices reopened today in Boulder, Colorado after historic flooding caused evacuations and flooding along the Front Range of Colorado. We’re glad everyone is safe!

  1. Does food waste help or hinder the environment? Here’s one take on it…(Macomb Daily)
  2. What’s that buzzing? After 25 years the short haired bumblebee is making a comeback (Guardian)
  3. Case for climate change is overwhelming, say scientists (Guardian)
  4. In Germany, schools in different states are slowly starting to incorporate the subject of sustainability into their syllabus (DW)
  5. Scottish Wind Farms produce a more expensive form of electricity due to higher costs of production (Guardian)

 

 

Farm to Closet: The Joys of Dyeing Naturally

Written by | September 16th, 2013

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Why choose synthetic clothing dye when blueberries, spinach and turmeric can produce rich, natural colors? For the next step in the quest to follow wool from farm to closet, we’re turning to nature to find dye for our yarn.

Duke of Cambridge Pledges to Work for Conservation

Written by | September 12th, 2013

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The Nature Conservancy was invited to join United for Wildlife, a groundbreaking new conservation collaboration founded by His Royal Highness, The Duke of Cambridge.

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