Category: Adaptation

The Green Buzz: Friday, June 28

Written by | June 28th, 2013

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We’re up bright and early bringing you another radiant edition of Green Buzz! So put on your sunscreen, grab a coffee and lets buzz!

  1. University of Michigan students are burning up the competition with their solar creation. (HuffPo)
  2. It’s the customers of this Virginia utility company that are getting paid from Dominion’s new solar program. (NBC)
  3. The Sun is not too hot for these fourth graders… (TreeHugger)
  4. Hiding in the shadows in Cambodia, a new species of bird has been found! (Guardian)
  5. Like we really needed a reason to post a picture of a cute duck! Thanks to Buttercup’s adopted father, this duck is walking like a new woman! (TreeHugger)

The Green Buzz: Friday, June 14

Written by | June 14th, 2013

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Near extinct Philippine Eagle found to be thriving elsewhere in the Philippines – queue the R. Kelly track, “I believe I can fly.”

  1. National bird of the Philippines found nesting in previously unknown region, leads to conservation effort (ABS-CBN)
  2. The joys of teaching conservation to kids while fishing. (Gannet)
  3. Conservation leads to job opportunities in Zambia (Times of Zambia)
  4. Cultivation of sea cucumbers leads to conservation efforts in Madagascar (National Geographic)
  5. VIDEO: Glacier collapses in Argentina (AP)

 

 

 

The Green Buzz: Friday, May 31

Written by | May 31st, 2013

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Green Buzz News Time!

  1. What happens when you ask 14-18 year olds how to debate science? (Guardian)
  2. This bird gives a whole new meaning to the term, “early bird”. (Guardian)
  3. Ok, did you really wanna see that new Will Smith movie? Or just know why humans are on the menu? (Forbes)
  4. George Michael was right (the singer, not the character from Arrested Development), sometimes the clothes do not make the man or in this case, mice. (TreeHugger)
  5. Oakland has a new landmark, a natural science museum for the public. (NPR)

The Green Buzz: Friday, May 24

Written by | May 24th, 2013

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You might need the entire long weekend to catch those newly evolved cockroaches.

  1. A camera trap got footage of one of the rarest, most highly threatened big cats in the world. (TreeHugger)
  2. Yesterday they had the 10 worst, today it’s the 10 best cities to live through climate change. (Grist)
  3. NOAA is predicting an “extremely active” Atlantic hurricane season. (NPR)
  4. A conservation agency approved the slaughter of tens of thousands of endangered birds. (Guardian)
  5. Cockroaches are evolving to evade our traps. (BBC)

The Green Buzz: Thursday, May 16

Written by | May 16th, 2013

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We’ve got some interesting news on the climate change front this morning.

  1. America has its first climate change refugees. (Grist)
  2. The Farm Bill has been approved by the House. (Huffington Post)
  3. What’s blue, provides over 80 percent of U.S. fresh water, and is suffering? The Great Lakes. (MNN)
  4. They’re supposed to protect the rhinos, but the black market is creating poachers out of park rangers. (NPR)
  5. Looks like the bond between human and dog may be deeper than we thought. (National Geographic)

Green Mom: It’s the Little Things

Written by | May 10th, 2013

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When the state of the environment feels overwhelming, it’s good to remind yourself — and your children — that little things can create big change.

Cities and Climate After Sandy: How Should We Prepare?

Written by | January 29th, 2013

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Hurricane Sandy was a wakeup call for coastal cities — but what should we do next? Five experts took on that question in the first of this spring’s “Nature and Our Future” panel discussions from the Conservancy.

Expedition to the Spice Islands: Designing a Resilient Network of Marine Protected Areas

Written by | December 5th, 2012

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The Banda Islands are a high priority for marine conservation, and an important area to expand the coverage of marine protected areas (MPAs) in Indonesia.

Expedition to the Spice Islands: Challenges and Opportunities for Marine Conservation

Written by | November 20th, 2012

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The Banda Islands have a rich and violent history as the Spice Islands.

Expedition to the Spice Islands: A Refuge for an Endangered Species

Written by | November 20th, 2012

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Napoleon Wrasse are never very abundant, although they do form small aggregations of tens to more than a 100 fish to reproduce. They also change sex from female to male, so most small adults are female and it is mainly the males that exceed 1m in length. Sometimes around spawning time, you can see a harem of Napoleon Wrasse comprising a large male and several smaller females.

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