Q&A with Revolution’s Elizabeth Mitchell and Billy Burke

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Published on April 29th, 2013  |  Discuss This Article  

Q&A with Revolution's Elizabeth Mitchell and Billy Burke

Eric Kripke is the creator and executive producer of NBC’s drama Revolution, airing Mondays at 10pm. He is also the creator and executive producer of the TV show Supernatural.

When the power goes out, you live a little closer to nature — whether you want to or not. No one knows this better than the characters on NBC’s Revolution, who have no choice but to exist in an electricity-free world reclaimed by nature, thanks to a (seemingly) permanent global blackout. Charlie, Miles and the gang must rely on the planet for food, water and shelter.

Lucky for most of us, we don’t have to live without power, but that doesn’t mean we can’t show our appreciation of all the great things that nature provides.

This marks our final weekly green-themed Q&A with Revolution cast members — today we’re chatting with Elizabeth Mitchell who plays Rachel Matheson and Billy Burke who plays Miles Matheson about their appreciation for nature and how they’re leaving lighter footprints on our planet. In case you missed it, check out our interviews with Revolution’s Daniella Alonso and Zak Orth and Matt Pitts.


Q&A with Elizabeth Mitchell who plays Rachel Matheson on Revolution

Q&A with Revolution’s Elizabeth Mitchell

Conservancy Talk: What’s your favorite movie set in nature?

Actor Elizabeth Mitchell: Probably Enchanted April. The awakening of the land so beautifully mirrored the awakening of the characters.

Conservancy Talk: What’s your favorite energy-saving tip?

Elizabeth Mitchell: Read. Talk to the ones you love. Play board games and marbles by candlelight.

Conservancy Talk: Why is protecting the planet important to you?

Elizabeth Mitchell: It’s all we have. It’s our boat. It’s my son’s future. Our children’s future.

Conservancy Talk: What was your most memorable experience in nature?

Elizabeth Mitchell: I was on a walk with my son and a tiny owl landed right in front of us. Magical.


Q&A with Billy Burke who plays Miles Matheson on Revolution

Q&A with Revolution’s Billy Burke

Conservancy Talk: What’s your favorite movie set in nature?

Actor Billy Burke: Jeremiah Johnson. Loved it since I was a kid. All filmed in the area of the Colorado Rocky Mountains that became Robert Redford’s inspiration for the Sundance Institute.

Conservancy Talk: What are you most excited for viewers to see on this season of Revolution?

Billy Burke: For me it’s all about the dirt and dead ends on the road to understanding our humanity. One of the great themes of the show is learning to deal with what we’ve got. Our characters have to manipulate our circumstance and surroundings as best we can but those who don’t do it with respect don’t last long. The sacrifices we have to make in order to keep what and who we love and the hidden rewards therein — that’s what’s fun to watch.

Conservancy Talk: What would you miss most if the power went out?

Billy Burke: Music is pretty much the be all end all. Yeah, I can make my own but if I couldn’t listen to the great recordings anymore that would disintegrate a huge chunk of my soul.

Conservancy Talk: What would you do if the power went out?

Billy Burke: Impossible to answer. No one truly knows what they would or wouldn’t, could or couldn’t do. Human nature indicates that instinctually we’d all just try to not die.

Conservancy Talk: What’s your favorite energy-saving tip?

Billy Burke: Esoterically, I’d say why use more than you have to? It’s exhausting.

Conservancy Talk: What’s your favorite part of being on Revolution?

Billy Burke: I genuinely adore the lovely, tireless, gifted, insane people I’ve been lucky enough to be surrounded by.

Conservancy Talk: Who are your environmental heroes?

Billy Burke: I feel like the people we are all most indebted to are those who’s names we’ll never know. Those who spend their lives in silent servitude making sure the things most of us never think about get taken care of. I salute them endlessly wherever they may be.

Conservancy Talk: Why is protecting the planet important to you?

Billy Burke: Let’s face it we could all do better. When I watch my daughter collecting dead flowers in what she thinks is a beautiful bouquet, the irony is alarming.

Conservancy Talk: What was your most memorable experience in nature?

Billy Burke: I grew up in the Pacific Northwest on some of the more extraordinary landscapes we still have on this planet. I worked all through high school at the Mt. Baker Ski Area. Quite a few of the most intense and treasured moments of my youth took place on that mountain under that relentlessly grey, rainy sky.

Conservancy Talk: What do you do to go green in your daily life?

Billy Burke: Well, I’d love to say I drive a car fueled by exhaust-free recycled styrofoam but I don’t (it is a hybrid though). I wash it with tears to conserve water.

Conservancy Talk: What do you do to go green on set?

Billy Burke: If you watch the show you’ll see we do the abundance of our shooting outdoors. The settings are magnificent and we make all efforts to keep them that way. I’ve always been a big fan of cleaning up after myself.

Conservancy Talk: Have you had any memorable nature encounters on set?

Billy Burke: The “roast your face off” heat in Wilmington, NC in the summer is a constant reminder that the weather extremes ain’t gettin’ any kinder. Add a couple of sprints and a sword fight to that and you’ve got my nature memories of this past season.

Conservancy Talk: Where’s your favorite Revolution shooting location?

Billy Burke: I love it when we’re anywhere outside at night and it’s still balmy from the preceding day. When your skin is the same temperature as the air you feel like you’re a part of the hugeness. When it’s clear and you can look up and see the entire universe it makes you feel as small as you really are.

Conservancy Talk: Where’s your favorite natural place?

Billy Burke: Every place is natural. So again, esoterically I’d honestly say my favorite place is wherever I’m at. I’ve grown into a bit of a city boy since my early years so I don’t get away to wide open spaces much. I did love the Gold Coast of Australia. The Mexican Riviera is also pretty sweet. I think I’ll always have a soft spot for the Cascade mountains of Washington State though.

Conservancy Talk: Do you have any natural beauty tips?

Billy Burke: Please. You got any for me?

Conservancy Talk: What’s your favorite organic food/snack/meal?

Billy Burke: Wine? That’s organic, right?

Conservancy Talk: What would you bring on an Earth Day picnic?

Billy Burke: My daughter and an arugula salad. Yeah, she’s 4 years old and actually loves arugula.

[Images: Courtesy of NBC]

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Comments: Q&A with Revolution’s Elizabeth Mitchell and Billy Burke

  •  Comment from JS

    I spent 7 months last year living in a cabin/house with no power and all but 1 month of it with no formal running water (most of the time hauling jugs of water in mostly just for drinking). Mind you, I live in America and did this by choice trying to accomplish something greater in life and to fulfill a sense to give back as it were. Through it I can tell you here and now that living like that was, although not impossible, it was extremely hard and stressful in many ways (the sheer work of it, trying to stay clean to avoid illness, clean water for all its uses, safety, etc). So, although I respect people who are hardy and sufficient enough to live ‘out’ like that – there is now way I would ever choose the “natural” path myself – it is simply ridiculous.
    PS: Love the show

  •  Comment from Laura

    Dear Mr. Kripke,

    My husband and I thoroughly enjoy your show. This interview was very nice to read. However, I found a few typos in the write up. One of the responses read: “It my son’s future.” Which should’ve been “It’s”. The other response stated….”why use more than you have too?” That is the improper use of “too” which means also. Therefore it should’ve been “why use more than you have to?”

    With all due respect, these errors are quite difficult for me to overlook considering I was a teacher. Now I am a stay-at-home mom. If you ever need anything edited, feel free to email me. I am always finding typos in books, articles, online, etc.

    Sincerely,

    Laura :)

    •  Comment from Madeline Breen

      Thank you, Laura! These errors have been fixed. -Madeline, Conservancy Talk editor

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